The verger by somerset maugham summary

Somerset Maugham we have the theme of appearance, opportunity, dedication, independence and humility. Taken from his Collected Short Stories collection the story is narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator and after reading the story the reader realises that Maugham may be exploring the theme of appearance. He prefers to keep it for weddings and funerals.

The verger by somerset maugham summary

Somerset Maugham There had been a christening that afternoon at St. He kept his new one, its folds as full and stiff though it were made not of alpaca but of perennial bronze, for funerals and weddings St.

Peter's, Neville Square, was a church much favoured by the fashionable for these ceremonies and now he wore only his second-best. He wore it with complacence for it was the dignified symbol of his office, and without it when he took it off to go home he had the disconcerting sensation of being somewhat insufficiently clad.

He took pains with it; he pressed it and ironed it himself. During the sixteen years he had been verger of this church he had had a succession of such gowns, but he had never been able to throw them away when they were worn out and the complete series, neatly wrapped up in brown paper, lay in the bottom drawers of the wardrobe in his bedroom.

The verger busied himself quietly, replacing the painted wooden cover on the marble font, taking away a chair that had been brought for an infirm old lady, and waited for the vicar to have finished in the vestry so that he could tidy up in there and go home. Presently he saw him walk across the chancel, genuflect in front of the high altar and come down the aisle; but he still wore his cassock.

He liked things in church to be just so, but he never fussed; he was not like this new man who wanted to have his finger in every pie. But Albert Edward was tolerant.

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Peter's was in a very good neighbourhood and the parishioners were a very nice class of people. The new vicar had come from the East End and he couldn't be expected to fall in all at once with the discreet ways of his fashionable congregation.

I have something to say to you. Funny 'ow the baby stopped cryin' the moment you took him. The verger knew that it pleased him to be complimented on his talent. The vicar preceded Albert Edward into the vestry. Albert Edward was a trifle surprised to find the two churchwardens there.

He had not seen them come in. They gave him pleasant nods. Good afternoon, sir," he said to one after the other. They were elderly men, both of them and they had been churchwardens almost as long as Albert Edward had been verger.

They were sitting now at a handsome refectory table that the old vicar had brought many years before from Italy and the vicar sat down in the vacant chair between them.

Albert Edward faced them, the table between him and them and wondered with slight uneasiness what was the matter. He remembered still the occasion on which the organist had got in trouble and the bother they had all had to hush things up.

In a church like St. Peter's, Neville Square, they couldn't afford scandal.

The Verger Summary

On the vicar's red face was a look of resolute benignity but the others bore an expression that was slightly troubled. That's what it is, you mark my words. He stood in a respectful but not obsequious attitude. He had been in service before he was appointed to his ecclesiastical office, but only in very good houses, and his deportment was irreproachable.

Starting as a page-boy in the household of a merchant-prince he had risen by due degrees from the position of fourth to first footman, for a year he had been single-handed butler to a widowed peeress and, till the vacancy occurred at St.

Peter's, butler with two men under him in the house of a retired ambassador. He was tall, spare, grave and dignified. He looked, if not like a duke, at least like an actor of the old school who specialised in dukes' parts. He had tact, firmness and self-assurance.

His character was unimpeachable. The vicar began briskly. You've been here a great many years and I think his lordship and the general agree with me that you've fulfilled the duties of your office to the satisfaction of everybody concerned. I discovered to my astonishment that you could neither read nor write.

He always said there was a great deal too much education in the world for 'is taste. The cook in the first place tried to teach me once, but I didn't seem to 'ave the knack for it, and then what with one thing and another I never seemed to 'ave the time. I've never really found the want of it.

I think a lot of these young fellows waste a rare lot of time readin' when they might be doin' something useful. And of late years now they've all these pictures in the papers I get to know what's goin' on pretty well.The verger busied himself quietly, replacing the painted wooden cover on the marble font, taking away a chair that had been brought for an infirm old lady, and waited for the vicar to have finished in the vestry so that he could tidy up in there and go home.

Nov 11,  · The Verger was written by W. Somerset Maugham.

The verger by somerset maugham summary

He wanted you to read the book, so you would know the summary pfmlures.com: Resolved. The plot of "The Verger" is simple, like those of many of Somerset Maugham's short stories. The Verger by W. Somerset Maugham 3 Oct Dermot W.

Somerset Maugham Cite Post In The Verger by W. Somerset Maugham we have the theme of appearance, opportunity, dedication, independence and humility. Summary. Foreman had been the assistant (verger) to several priests who worked in St. Peter’s parish. He was most dedicated to his work and kept the purity of the work (he was next to the priest in offering prayers, etc.) He was a good man.

He had worked for sixteen years when a new priest took duty of the church. W. Somerset Maugham's story "The Verger" is set in a small church in which there has recently been a change in vicars. (Vicars were the local priests of a parish who performed most tasks of the.

pfmlures.com: "The Verger" by W Somerset Maugham